Furnace Vent Checkup

Here is a photo of a vent on a Furnace that has not been serviced in a long while.

photo
Vent failure will allow carbon monoxide to leak into the structure.

If you have a furnace that is more than 10 years old, the firebox should be inspected annually.

All of these failures can be noted on an annual service of your equipment. Often, if no service is done, this can be dangerous.

Part 2: WaiWela Tankless Water Heater Units: Ideal Fit for Snack Food Plant

Last week, we talked about Snak King Corporation, the largest snack food manufacturer that has been remodeling, reorganizing and upgrading its 177,000-square­ foot Kosher & Organic certified manufacturing plant. Here’s the 2nd part of their story about WaiWela Tankless Water Heater Units that they used for their snack food plant.

After many hours of compiling information relative to the application and evaluating Snak  King’s goals for their rebuilding project, as well as considering future capacity increase goals. Ponce proposed a new hot water system.  He took into account the following criteria:

  • Snak King’s manufacturing plant’s hot water demand load requirement is 120 gpm with long-term plant capacity increases to 165 gpm for up to 4-hour intervals: 7,200 to 9,900 gph
  • Snak King Corp’s  hot water system design operating  temperature  is  120°F; temperature rise of 6S°p’
  • Endless hot water supply
  • Limited available space
  • Energy efficiency required
  • Redundancy needed
  • Service ability without any downtime
  • Capacity expandability of the hot water system
  • Cost-effective solution

WaiWela Tankless Water Heater Based on the above criteria, Ponce proposed specifying for this application the WaiWela by Paloma Industries model PH28co commercial outdoor tankless water heater (WaiWela is  pronounced Vi Vela, which means hot water in Hawaiian). The PH28co model is a 199,900 Btuh rated system. One of these models is capable of producing 5.2 gpm at a 65°F rise. Twenty eight of them plumbed in parallel will produce 145.6 gpm or 8,736 gallons per hour endlessly.

Due to space limitations inside the Soak King manufacturing plant, Ponce proposed mounting 28 Wai Wela tankless water heaters on two skids in different locations on the roof of the plant. For the Snak King application, two galvanized steel skids were fabricated at grade by Coast Aerospace in Huntington Beach. Calif. One skid has 16 PH28co units plumbed in parallel with a 1/8-hp circulator pump to deliver immediate hot water to one area. The second skid has 12 of the units plumbed in parallel with 1/8-hp circulator pump to deliver immediate hot water to another area at the plant. Both skids arc mounted on the roof of the Snak King manufacturing facility. The lightweight size of this system allowed for installation   without increasing the load bearing of the roof.

The WaiWela by Paloma tankless water heater has an energy factor of 0.82. It is an energy-efficient tankless concept that uses only the amount of gas necessary to fill that demand. These high-efficiency units also qualified for rebates from the local gas company and federal tax property credits.

Each WaiWela tankless water heater bank is controlled by a MIC-180 multi­unit system controller. The controller will modulate the bank of WaiWela tankless water heaters per the demand and will sequence the water heaters to allow for equal shared usage. Multiple WaiWela water heaters were plumbed in parallel to provide redundancy and each was installed with an isolation valve kit to allow for individual servicing. The isolation valve kit by Webstone will allow for servicing each unit while not disrupting hot  water service to Snak King’s manufacturing plant below. Tru­Flex Metal Hose Corporation’s Home-Flex   high-volume gas connectors were installed to allow for the high Btu/h volume required for a tankles water heater. This allows the installing mechanical engineer to eliminate having 10 use rigid gas pipe to each tankless unit. Falcon Stainless Steel water connectors were also installed to eliminate plumbing rigid copper pipe from the 4-inch manifolds to each WaiWela unit.

Another advantage of this system was to allow for future expandability. The skid with 12 WaiWela tankless water heaters is set-up 10 be expanded to 16 units for increased future manufacturing capacity at the Snak King.

Finally, the cost of each commercial WaiWela tankless system was significantly less than a comparable boiler system. Each unit is less than 200,000 Btu/h, eliminating the need for ASME approval allowing for more affordable pricing.

The Snak King Corporation has an industry reputation for being an innovative manufacturer and marketer of unique and creative snack food products. Over the years, they have received many industry awards, including the 2006 Snack Manufacturer of the Year. Their line of products includes tortilla Chips, extruded   snacks, corn snacks, popcorn, caramel corn, nuts and pork rinds. Brands include EI Sabroso, Granny Goose, Jensen’s Orchard and private label.

For more information, call 800/605-6542 or visit www.waiwela.com.

WaiWela Tankless Units: Ideal Fit for Snack Food Plant

CITY OF INDUSTRY, CALIF. – The Snak King Corporation, located in City of Industry, has been remodeling, reorganizing and upgrading its 177,000-square­ foot Kosher & Organic certified manufacturing plant since 2004. The Snak King Corp. is one of the largest snack food manufacturers on the West Coast.

Quality Water Heaters: WaiWela Tankless Units’ Product Application

In October 2004, after IWO weeks of torrential rains swept through Southern California, Snak King’s manufacturing plant was crippled for three weeks after a 12,000 square-foot section of the rain weakened roof collapsed directly over the heart of the plant. Though the roof collapse struck at the heart of the plant and disrupted operation, it did not crush the spirit of this gritty, entrepreneurial company lead by chairman and CEO Barry Levin.

WaiWela Tankless As soon as Levin and his learn were sure they were going to survive the tragedy, they decided to lake the opportunity 10 rebuild the plant for the better and invested in “new roof, a new floor and new equipment. Their main goal for the rebuild project was to enhance the efficiency, consistency and capacity of the manufacturing plant with an eye on meeting the ever-increasing consume,” demand for their products now and in the future.

During the progression of Snak King’ rebuilding project, the capacity of its existing hot water system was evaluated by process engineers. They found that the existing hot water system would  not  be  adequate  to  handle  any capacity  increases,  so  they decided  to explore options for replacing the system.

They contacted Richard Ponce, a veteran in the tankless water heater industry who has been involved  in many commercial and residential project  over the years. Richard Ponce is the owner of OPW Sides LLC, a manufacturers’ representative agency, and a consultant who specializes in “Tankless Solutions.”

(For more, see Part 2: WaiWela Tankless Water Heater Units: Ideal Fit for Snack Food Plant, coming soon)

Part 2: Snack Food Product Manufacturer Craves Tankless

Last week on our 2-part blog series, we have talked about the renovation of Hot Water System for Snack Food Manufacturer.

After hours of compiling information relative to the application and evaluating Snak King’s goals for its rebuilding project, considering its future capacity goals, Ponce proposed the following hot water system:

Manufacturing plant hot water demand load requirement — 120 GPM with long term plant capacity increases to 165 GPM for up to four-hour intervals; 7,200 to 9,900 gallons per hour; and

Hot water system design operating temperature — 120° F; temperature rise: 65° F.

Other relative criteria:

  • Endless hot water supply;
  • Limited available space;
  • Energy efficiency required;
  • Redundancy needed;
  • Serviceability without any down time;
  • Capacity expandability of the hot water system; and
  • Cost effective solution

Based on the above criteria, Ponce proposed specifying for this application a multi-unit system of 28 WaiWela (pronounced “Vi-vela”) PH-28COF outdoor commercial tankless water heaters, manufactured by Paloma Industries. WaiWela means “hot water” in the Hawaiian language. The unit  is rated  with an input of 199,900 Btu/hr, so  the  28-unit system could modulate from the  minimum input of a single unit,  just 19,000 Btu/hr, up to 5.6 million Btu/hr  with  all heaters firing. With each unit capable of continuously producing 5.2 GPM hot water at the 120 set point, the system is capable of continuously producing 145.6 GPM, or 8,736 gallons per hour.

Space is limited inside the Snak King manufacturing plant so Ponce proposed mounting the 28 PH-28COFs on two skids in different locations on the roof of the plant. Coast Aerospace in Huntington Beach, Calif. fabricated two galvanized steel skids at grade.

blog 2 part1 image 1

One skid has 16 units plumbed in parallel with a 1/8 HP circulator pump to deliver immediate hot water to one area. The  second skid has  12  units plumbed in parallel  with  a 1/8  HP circulator to deliver hot water  to another area at the  plant. The light weight of this system allowed for installation without increasing the roof’s load capacity.

The WaiWela water heater has an energy factor of 0.82. The units are particularly energy efficient in this application because they modulate continuously to produce only the amount of additional heat needed by current demand in the system. These high-efficiency units also qualified for rebates from the local gas company and federal tax credits.

Each WaiWela bank is controlled by a MIC-180 multi-unit system controller, also produced by Paloma. The controller modulates  the firing of each WaiWela heater in the system, and  rotates the  sequence of firing to even  out usage of all units over the lifetime of the system.

In what is to be the largest tankless water heater installation in the United States to date, Snak King recently leveraged its innovative spirit in the implementation of a new hot water system for production processing.

The water heaters were plumbed in parallel to provide redundancy and each was installed with an isolation valve kit by Webstone to allow for individual servicing without disrupting hot water service to the manufacturing plant below. Tru-Flex Metal Hose Corporation’s Home-Flex high volume gas connectors were installed to allow for the high Btu/hr volume required for a tankless water heater. This allowed the installing mechanical engineer to eliminate using rigid gas pipe to each unit. Falcon Stainless Steel water connectors were also installed to eliminate plumbing rigid copper pipe from the 4″ manifolds to each water heater.

Another advantage of this system was to allow for future expandability. The skid holding 12 units is expandable to 16 units for increased future manufacturing capacity.

Finally, the cost of each commercial WaiWela tankless system was significantly less than a comparable boiler system. Each WaiWela tankless water heater, with input below 200,000 Btu/hr, did not require the ASME approval that can effectively raise the cost of larger systems.

Snack Food Product Manufacturer Craves Tankless

In this 2-part mini-blog series we’re going to talk about snack food manufacturer’s tankless water heater installation.

The Snak King Corporation, located in the City of Industry, Calif., and  one of the largest snack food manufacturers on the West Coast, has been remodeling and reorganizing and upgrading their 177,000 sq. ft. Kosher & Organic  certified manufacturing plant  since  2004.

The Snak King Corporation has an industry reputation for being an innovative manufacturer and marketer of unique and creative snack food products, and has received many industry awards, including the 2006 Snack Manufacturer of the Year. Its line of products includes tortilla chips, extruded snacks, corn snacks, popcorn, caramel corn, nuts and pork rinds.  Its brands include: El Sabroso, Granny Goose, Jensen’s Orchard and private label.

In what is to be the largest tankless water heater installation in the United States to date, Snak King recently leveraged its  innovative spirit  in  the implementation of a new hot  water system for production processing. The system used two banks of tankless water heaters to replace its previous system. Here is Snak King’s story and the background to their hot water innovation.

Water Tankless Unit

Collapsed Roof Spurs Change

In October 2004, after two weeks of torrential rains swept through Southern California, the company’s manufacturing plant was crippled for three weeks after a 12,000-sq.ft section of the roof collapsed directly over the heart of the plant. Though the roof collapse disrupted operation, it did not crush the spirit of this gritty, entrepreneurial company lead by chairman and CEO Barry Levin.

As soon as Levin and his team were sure the company was  going to  survive the tragedy, they decided to take the  opportunity to rebuild the plant for the better and invested in a new roof, a new floor and new equipment. Their main goal for the  rebuild project was to enhance efficiency, consistency and  capacity of the manufacturing plant  with an eye on  meeting ever-increasing consumer demand.

During the progression of the Snak King’s rebuilding project, process engineers evaluated the capacity of its existing hot water system. They found the system would not be adequate to handle any capacity increases, so they explored options for replacing the system.

They contacted Richard Ponce, a veteran in the tankless water heater industry, who has been involved in many commercial and residential projects over the years. Ponce owns GPW Sales LLC (www.tanklesssolutions.com), a manufacturer’s representative agency and consultant who specializes in tankless systems.

Stay tuned to find out more about the proposal for Snak King’s hot water system on Part 2: Snack Food Product Manufacturer Craves Tankless.

Part 2: Specifying a Hot Water System for a Snack Food Manufacturer

Last week, we talked about the Hot Water System for a Snack Food Manufacturer. Here’s the 2nd part of our blog specifying WaiWela tankless water heaters.

Due to space limitations inside the Snak King manufacturing plant, Ponce proposed mounting the 28 WaiWela tankless water heaters on two skids in different locations on the roof of the plant. Two galvanized steel skids were fabricated at grade by Coast Aerospace in Huntington Beach, CA. One skid has 16 PH28-COF units plumbed in parallel with a 1/8 HP circulator pump to deliver immediate hot water to one area. The second skid has 12 PH28-COF tankless units plumbed in parallel with a 1/8 HP circulator pump to deliver immediate hot water to another area at the plant. Both skids are mounted on the roof of the Snak King manufacturing facility. The lightweight design of this system allowed for installation without increasing the load bearing of the roof.

tankless water heater unitThe WaiWela by Paloma tankless water heater has an energy factor of 0.82. The tankless heaters are particularly energy efficient in this application because they modulate continuously to produce only the amount of additional heat needed by current demand in the system. These high-efficiency units also qualified for rebates from the local gas company and federal tax credits.

Each WaiWela tankless water heater bank is controlled by a MIC-180 multi-unit system controller, also produced by Paloma. The MIC-180 multi-unit system controller controls and modulates the firing of each WaiWela heater in the system, and rotates the sequence of firing to evenly distribute use of all units over the lifetime of the system.

The WaiWela water heaters were plumbed in parallel to provide redundancy and each was installed with an isolation valve kit to allow for individual servicing. The isolation valve kit by Webstone will allow for servicing each unit by itself without disrupting hot water service to Snak King’s manufacturing plant below. Tru-Flex Metal Hose Corp.’s Home-Flex high volume gas connectors were installed to allow for the high BTU/hr. volume required for a tankless water heater. This allowed the installing mechanical engineer to eliminate having to use rigid gas pipe to each tankless unit. Falcon Stainless Steel water connectors were also installed to eliminate plumbing rigid copper pipe from the 4-in. manifolds to each WaiWela tankless water heater.

Another advantage of this system was to allow for future expandability. The skid that has 12 WaiWela tankless water heaters is set-up to be expanded to 16 units for increased future manufacturing capacity at the Snak King.

Finally, the cost of each commercial tankless system was significantly less than a comparable boiler system. Each WaiWela tankless water heater, with input below 200,000 BTU/hr., did not require the ASME approval that can effectively raise the cost of larger systems.

Specifying a Hot Water System for a Snack Food Manufacturer

In this 2-part mini-blog series we’re going to talk about the Hot Water System for a Snack Food Manufacturer

The Snak King Corp., in City of Industry, CA, is one of the largest snack food manufacturers on the West Coast. Since 2004, the company has been remodeling, reorganizing and upgrading its 177,000 sq. ft. kosher and organic certified manufacturing plant.

Snak King Corp. has an industry reputation for being an innovative manufacturer and marketer of unique and creative snack food products. Over the years, the company has received many industry awards, including the 2006 Snack Manufacturer of the Year. Their line of products includes: tortilla chips, extruded snacks, corn snacks, popcorn, caramel corn, nuts and pork rinds. Their brands include: El Sabroso, Granny Goose, Jensen’s Orchard and private label.

hot water systemSnak King recently leveraged its innovative spirit in the implementation of a new hot-water system for production processing. The system used two banks of tankless water heaters to replace its previous system. Here is Snak King’s story and the background to their hot water innovation.

In October 2004, torrential rains pounded Southern California and crippled the Snak King’s manufacturing plant for 3 weeks. As it happened, the rain had weakened a 12,000 sq. ft. section of the roof, which collapsed directly over the heart of the plant. Although the roof collapse struck at the heart of the plant and disrupted operation, it did not crush the spirit of this gritty, entrepreneurial company lead by chair- man and CEO Barry Levin.

While the roof collapse left a scar on the company, Levin and his team discovered an opportunity to rebuild the plant and invest in new flooring and equipment.

The primary goal of the rebuild project was to enhance efficiency, consistency and capacity of the plant while continuing to meet increasing consumer demands.

As the project progressed, process engineers evaluated the capacity of the existing hot-water system and determined that it would not be adequate to handle an increase in capacity. Therefore, the engineers began researching options for replacing the system.

The engineers contacted Richard Ponce, a veteran in the tankless water heater industry, who has experience working in many commercial and residential projects.

Ponce began compiling information relative to the application and evaluating Snak King’s goals for the rebuilding project. He also considered the future capacity increase goals. Ponce proposed the following hot-water system.

Snak King Corp.’s manufacturing plant hot water demand load requirement: 120 gpm with long-term plant capacity increases to 165 gpm for up to 4-hour intervals; 7,200 to 9,900 gallons per hour (gph).

Snak King Corp.’s hot-water system design operating temperature: 120°F; temperature rise: 65°F.

Other relative hot-water system criteria:

  • endless hot water supply
  • limited available space
  • energy efficiency required
  • redundancy needed
  • serviceability without any down time
  • capacity expandability of the hot water system
  • cost-effective solution

Based on the above criteria, Ponce proposed specifying for this application a multi-unit system of 28 WaiWela PH-28COF outdoor commercial tankless water heaters, manufactured by Paloma Industries. WaiWela, which is pronounced “Vi-vela,” means hot water in the Hawaiian language. The WaiWela PH28-COF tankless water heater is rated with an input of 199,900 BTU/hr., so the 28-unit system could modulate from the minimum input of a single unit, just 19,000 BTU/hr., up to 5.6 million BTU/hr. with all heaters firing. With each unit capable of continuously producing 5.2 gpm hot water at the 120 setpoint, the system is capable of continuously producing 145.6 gpm, or 8,736 gph.

(For more, see Part 2: Specifying a Hot Water System for a Snack Food Manufacturer, coming soon)